pdf icon-close person mp3 pntv podcast search affirmation meditation Headphones Arrow left icon-bell icon-pnotes icon-masterClasses icon-microClasses icon-plusOne icon-angle icon-star icon-play-circle icon-music-note icon-play icon-file icon-mic icon-folder icon-quote-left icon-quote-right icon-facebook icon-twitter icon-linkedin icon-star-filled icon-youtube icon-website icon-chevron icon-crown icon-crown-mono icon-crown-alt icon-edit icon-email icon-warning icon-lock icon-caret icon-quote Notifications Search Close icon-messages icon-triangle-down icon-menu icon-home icon-user icon-book icon-oasis icon-settings icon-join icon-arrow icon-featured-star icon-map-pin icon-calendar icon-featured-star-colored icon-live-video icon-triangle-rounded qa-cta-icon icon-skinny-arrow icon-reload icon-file-mp3 icon-file-pdf icon-file-meditation icon-download icon-get-pdf icon-compound icon-watch icon-a-z icon-z-a icon-checkmark obw-oasis obw-local obw-coach icon-bullseye icon-reading illustrated-lock

Showing 154 tag results for “old-school-classic”

PhilosophersNotes(14)

  • Trying Not to Try Ancient China, Modern Science, and the Power of Spontaneity

    by Edward Slingerland

    Edward Slingerland is one of the world’s leading experts on both ancient Chinese thought AND modern cognitive science. This book is a melding of those two realms. It’s a truly fascinating read. I read it in a day and felt like I was spending the day hanging out with a brilliant thinker—getting privileged access to twenty years of deep thinking. If you’re into ancient wisdom and modern science I think you’ll love the book as much as I did. Big Ideas we explore include defining wu-wei + de (one of the coolest words/concepts ever), what Confucius + Lao Tzu + Mencius + Chuang Tzu have to say about wu-wei, and the spontaneity of mirrors.

  • Discourses

    by Epictetus

    Epictetus is known as one of the world’s leading Stoic philosophers. (Along with Seneca and Marcus Aurelius, the three make up a very interesting bunch.) Epictetus was a former slave turned philosopher who lived from 55-135 (a little later than Seneca and before Aurelius). This book is a transcription of the informal lectures Epictetus gave to his students. It’s awesome. Big Ideas we explore: why Hercules needed challenges (and so do you), what figs can teach us about greatness, the good + the bad + the indifferent and how to tell the difference, “impressions” and the tricks they play, and the fact NOW is the time to live this stuff.

  • On the Shortness of Life Life Is Long If You Know How to Use It

    by Seneca

    Seneca was an old-school Roman statesman and one of history’s leading Stoic philosophers. In this book he tells us that life is only short if you don’t know how to use it and also gives us some tips on how to deal with challenging times and cultivate tranquility. Big Ideas we explore include making T.O.D.A.Y. the day, how to deal with being exiled (never know when it could happen ;), and why flexibility is the virtuous road to tranquility (and how to avoid the detours).

  • The Way of the Bodhisattva

    by Shantideva

    The Way of the Bodhisattva is one of the classics of Buddhism that teaches us the key elements of the Bodhisattva—one who has dedicated his or her life to serving the world and releasing all sentient beings from suffering. In this Note, we’ll check out the importance of cultivating bodhichitta (an “awakened mind”) and how we can do it. (Hint: It’s all about “diligence in virtuous ways”! :)

  • Thus Spoke Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Nietzsche

    Nietzsche was said to deliver his philosophy with a hammer and this book definitely nails his disdain for conditioning and conformity. In the Note, we'll take a peek at some really Big Ideas including the fact that our worst enemy is often inside our own heads, that sometimes we need to push ourselves to discover just how far we can go, and how we’ve gotta be willing to go into the depths of our being if we want to fly.

  • The Tao Te Ching

    by Lao Tzu

    The Tao te Ching. It's the core text of Taoism and one of the top old school classics of all time. In this Note, we'll take a look at everything from making use of solitude to the fact that the journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step (heard that before, eh?!). We'll also learn to let go of our attachment to future results and gracefully roll with the ebbs and flows of life.

  • The Selected Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson

    by Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Ralph Waldo Emerson is a hero of mine (he occupies the Great-Great+ Grandfather slot in my spiritual family tree) and his essays, although written in 19th century prose, totally fire me up. In this Note, we'll explore some Big Ideas on self-reliance (trust yourself!!!), the power of enthusiasm (did you know the word literally means "God within"?!), and how God will not have his work made manifest by cowards. Plus other goodness.

  • The Enchiridion

    by Epictetus

    Epictetus is one of three Stoic philosophers we profile (Marcus Aurelius and Seneca are the other two) and this former slave turned leading philosopher of his era is incredible. He echoes the wisdom of all the great teachers as he reminds us that, if we want to be happy, we've gotta realize the only thing we have control over is our response to a situation. We'll have fun tapping into a lot more of his vast mojo in the Note.

  • The Dhammapada The Sayings of Buddha

    by Eknath Easwaran

    A core text of Buddhism, The Dhammapada literally means something along the lines of "the path of truth and righteousness" and is packed with wisdom. In this Note, we'll take a quick look at some central tenets of Buddhism (like the Four Noble Truths, nirvana, and the eightfold path) and soak up some Buddha mojo on how to rock our wisest lives.

  • The Bhagavad Gita A Classic of Indian Spirituality

    by Krishna, Eknath Easwaran

    The classic text of Hinduism is *packed* with wisdom. In the Note, we take a super quick look at the context for the book and then jump into some powerful wisdom—including the importance of meditation, the fact that making mistakes is an inherent part of our growth process and the uber-importance of letting go of our attachment to results.

  • Show more PhilosophersNotes

    Loading more PhilosophersNotes for you...

Optimize +1

Ready to Optimize your life?

Get 10 free days of +1 Optimizing—the world’s best wisdom distilled into micro-lessons you can apply to your life today. (And every (!) day.)